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Is Marijuana Addictive?

Marijuana is among the most abused drugs globally and is extremely popular among youths. A marijuana addiction diagnosis is rare and only in severe cases where there is excessive consumption of marijuana frequently. Health specialists refer to this drug dependence as a cannabis use disorder; the patient requires a dose of marijuana to function accordingly. Not everybody who smokes weed gets addicted; here are the signs you can observe to know someone is a marijuana addict.

How To Know Someone is Addicted to Marijuana

Strong Cravings

An intense craving for marijuana use is one of the most significant indicators of a marijuana addict. You will find that the individual is willing to sacrifice their daily responsibilities to get high. If you find yourself in such a situation, it would be wise to consider rehab or other helpful programs.

Loss of Interest in Activities

You are correct to assume someone is addicted to marijuana if you observe a significant change in their likes and interests. They are more likely to sacrifice an activity they enjoy over smoking with other users. You may also find that these individuals find it hard to maintain healthy relationships among friends and family, leading to a complete socializing withdrawal. Lack of motivation, inability to keep up with responsibilities and the lack of desire to pursue your goals are other effects linked to marijuana dependency.

Withdrawal Symptoms

If you experience withdrawals after a long time without ingesting marijuana, you are most likely addicted to marijuana. Marijuana withdrawal symptoms include irritability, decreased appetite, insomnia, and restlessness. Most of these symptoms are mild and last up to two weeks; they tend to peak within the first week after you quit.

Increased Tolerance

Excessive marijuana consumption will equal an increased tolerance to the drug. Drug tolerance involves the effect that the drugs consumed have on your system, and it significantly dictates the intensity of your experience. The most common cause for that tolerance increase is that users are always trying to achieve their desired high, even if it means increasing their dose. The more weed you consume, the more your body tolerates the drug’s effects, requiring you to take a larger amount.

Ignoring Negative Consequences and Continuing to Use

Another aspect you can find helpful in identifying a patient suffering from marijuana-use disorder is that they ignore the negative consequences of cannabis in their lives. Your addiction may lead you to make questionable decisions in the past, and despite these events, you continue to use them. Some of the negative consequences of marijuana include impaired memory, paranoia, financial instability, and cognitive impairment.

How Marijuana Use Affects Your Brain

There are several risks involved in frequent and excessive cannabis use, according to The Process Recovery Center. You are at a higher risk of developing a cannabis-use disorder if you started using it in your teenage years or consume large amounts regularly. You get to feel high after the plant releases its psychoactive components that intoxicate your system; they are Tetrahydrocannabinol. The structural similarity of this compound to other human body elements allows THC to attach itself to the respective brain receptors, which disrupt normal brain functioning.

The THC compounds affect specific parts of your brain, parts that control mood, concentration, memory, and thinking. The enjoyable effects of marijuana include a relaxation feeling, euphoria, altered sense of time, and distortions in sensory perception.

Every marijuana user must understand the effects this drug has on their system and avoid getting addicted. Cannabis use disorder is only common to individuals with heavy consumption of marijuana, affecting their overall health and lifestyle. You can use the shared signs to observe if a friend or relative suffers from a marijuana use disorder and arrange appropriate corrective measures.

A post by Kidal D. (5422 Posts)

Kidal D. is author at LeraBlog. The author's views are entirely their own and may not reflect the views and opinions of LeraBlog staff.

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