UK's Royal Navy Carrier Named in Honor of Queen Elizabeth II

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Rosyth Dockyard ceremonyAt Fife's Rosyth Dockyard ceremony, a new vessel was named officially in the honor of Queen Elizabeth II. She says that the largest warship of the UK indicatesa new stage in the naval history. On the body of HMS Queen Elizabeth, a whisky bottle was smashed and this 65000-tonne Royal Navy carrier is under construction.

At Fife's Rosyth Dockyard ceremony, a new vessel was named officially in the honor of Queen Elizabeth II. She says that the largest warship of the UK indicatesa new stage in the naval history. On the body of HMS Queen Elizabeth, a whisky bottle was smashed and this 65000-tonne Royal Navy carrier is under construction.

Before the naming of the ship, the officials flew the Red Arrows above the dockyard. George Zambellas, who is the first admiral of Sea Lord, said that the carrier was safe for Queen. According to him, HMS Queen Elizabeth is going to be a national sign of authority and national tool for power.

Hence, she is going to become a national icon while holding the royal image in Royal Navy and great personality in Great Britain.

The Symbol of Pride and Inspiration

While addressing the people, Queen Elizabeth II added that the warship is first class and innovative and largest of its kind ever made in the UK and escorted in the amazing new era. While backing the new carrier, the Queen believes that she will definitely become the icon of pride and inspiration for all.On the ceremony, the Duke of Edinburgh complemented the Queen and bottle was released by the monarch who pressed a button and it was smashed off the ship.

In the construction and design of the royal navy carrier, over 3500 workers were involved. In addition to them, politicians and dignitaries were also involved, such as First Prime Minister Alex Salmond, ex-PM Gordon Brown and current PM David Cameron. Mr. Cameron addressed the UK and Scotland for this proud day and Mr. Salmond congratulated all the workers and families for this great day. The Queen describes it as a massive achievement for the country when a single malt whisky bottle was broken to show the name of the carrier. According to the Alliance of Carrier who is supervising the construction of carrier, lan Booth, addresses it as a historic event. The navy carrier reflects the ingenuity and British design at its best.

The fly-past of the Red Arrows was inspired from the predecessors of the Royal Navy carrier, along with de Havilland Sea Vixen jet which was the historic in the 1950s. It was the world's only one and last aircraft of its type.

The Queen pressed the button to oversee the ceremony and pressed the button and released the bottle in front of ship and it was smashed over the hull. The ceremony of naming the sea is a marine tradition which dates back several decades.

In the UK, six shipyards along with Rosyth, Tyne, and Appledore were included in making carrier's parts. On HMS Queen Elizabeth, over 100 companies were involved and over 10000 workers were working on it. Initially, the cost of construction was projected as £3.65 billion. And the cost estimated of the construction of the carrier along with its sister vessel is £6.2 billion.

At one time, the capacity of the warship is 40 helicopters and jets and it is longer than 25 buses in a row. A Crew of over 1600 workers will be involved permanently in it when its service will start in the year 2020.

According to Mr. Booth, this vessel is like a floating military city which will operate as disaster relief center and deploy several aircrafts.

This new carrier is going to float by the Royal Navy on American Independence Day. However, the ceremony shows that the intention of the UK is to project military power independently for future decades in the world. In Britain, it is the largest warship and is going to deploy jets which were built hugely in the US.

To know more, be sure to visit royalista.com.

A post by Stuart Clock (5 Posts)

Stuart Clock is author at LeraBlog. The author's views are entirely his/her own and may not reflect the views and opinions of LeraBlog staff.

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