Interiors

How to keep your kids’ room organized?

Keeping things organized with your kids is a mountain of a task that you need to surmount. Kids’ have a lot of stuff including their toys, books, stationery, clothes, and many more. They tend to pick a new object now and then and leave it wherever they use it. One way to keep the room decluttered is to have enough storage space to manage their jammed world.

Although having storage is essential, you also need a strategy to declutter the kids’ room and involve them in the cleaning process. Sounds challenging? Well! Most parents struggle in this department which is why we have brought some suggestions from the experts to assist you in keeping a tidy children’s room.

  • Buy the right furniture

As mentioned earlier, make sure you have room to keep the stuff safe and organized. You can choose furniture pieces like a bed with storage underneath, a chest with an extension to be used as a table, and many more. These smart pieces allow you to have plenty of storage even in small rooms. You can click here to check and buy smartly designed cupboards and multipurpose furniture with built-in storage.

  • Cultivate the habit right from the beginning

Habits that are inculcated at early age stay for the entire lifetime. Once your kids reach 4- 5 years of age, it will be difficult to make them do things they are not used to and find boring. It might be difficult in the beginning to make your 3 or 4-year-old pick things and keep them at the right place. But by doing so, you can make declutter and cleaning very obvious for them. Once the habit is made, it will make your life much easier.

  • Emphasize deciding the right place for everything

You can use the phrases such as to decide ‘the home’ of everything. Affix the right place for all their belongings and call the place the home for the stuff. Asking kids to keep a thing at the place where it lives is a better way to ask them to put it away. It is more positive and makes the cleaning process an interesting activity for them.

  • Encourage them to let go of unnecessary things

Kids easily get attached to their toys, books, and other stuff. Encourage the practice of giving away things that they no longer use or need. You can ask them to donate or charity their stuff instead of asking them to throw it away to make decluttering a positive practice. It will not only help in organizing their stuff but also nurture values such as empathy and care for others. It makes them more social and helpful.

  • Make cleaning a fun game

Kids love to do things that seem like a game. Make decluttering a game as well. You can ask them to count the things they are picking and take them to their respective homes as The count reaches 10. You can also celebrate the homecoming of the objects with a short cheer or a high five. Once all the things are in their place, you can give them small healthy treats such as their fruit or a trip to the park.

  • Create boundaries with the room decor

This is an amazing idea that keeps children bounded to a particular area while playing and prevents them from messing up the entire room. For instance, place a rug under the table and allow them to play on it. This not only serves as a visual anchor for the room but also creates a room within the room for kids to play. While playing on the rug, they will subconsciously stay only on it and the rest of the room will not be disturbed.

  • Practice what you preach

This is a cliche that is still meaningful in every aspect of life and teaching decluttering to Kids are no exception. Kids learn more by observing their surroundings instead of by taking instructions. Make sure you also keep the remaining house organized. Keep everything in its right place and make special efforts to organize the home on weekends. This will allow you to work with your kids, spend some more time with them, make decluttering a family activity, and make it a lifestyle for the kids.

A post by Kidal D. (5015 Posts)

Kidal D. is author at LeraBlog. The author's views are entirely their own and may not reflect the views and opinions of LeraBlog staff.

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