7 Special Event Photography Tips For Beginner Photographers

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Special galas, corporate parties, non-profit fundraisers, etc.; when someone asks you to shoot these events, you don’t exactly leap up in joy; do you?

Event photography can get a bad reputation among creative people, primarily because of the unglamorous nature of its style.

While it’s true that most aspects of event photography can be very rote in nature, these events can also provide you with a huge advantage leading to a more creative expression provided you know the ways of using your camera the right way. Maybe, the following tips can help.

  1. Be prepared

Before we get to the discussion of improving your event photography skills, let’s take a quick look at your preparation logistics that can help you save a whole lot of time and effort.

  • Do your research

Know about who’s at the event, what the event is about, what particular activities are happening, and where specific activities are held. This will ensure that you don’t miss out on important moments.

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  • Dress appropriately

Event photographers should wear something neutral in color. Bright colors can be tremendously distracting because they can create an undesirable color cast as a result of it getting reflected from the photographer’s clothing on to the subject.

You must also ensure that your shoes are quiet and comfortable enough to your liking.

  • Have a photo shoot list

Having a detailed “things to do” list can be an excellent tool between yourself and your client. It makes sure your cover everything during your photo shoot saving you a lot of time and peace of mind.

  1. Bring the right gear

You do not need a load of fancy equipment to do event photography.

A full frame DSLR with mid-range zoom, an external power flash accompanied by a reflector or a diffuser, memory cards, and spare batteries are more than enough for the job.

If the event is taking place in a large hall, you may also consider going for a telephoto lens.

  1. Get up early to shoot pre-event photographs

Arrive around fifteen to thirty minutes early, depending on the style of the event.

You can use this time to make friends with the guests, so they don’t hesitate later when you ask for a photograph.

  1. Know the apt time of using a flash

Most photographers love the feel of natural lighting. However, understanding when and how to use the artificial light can be of excellent value in low-light environments.

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When doing event photography indoors, it’s strongly recommended for you to use an external flash where the light can bounce off the ceiling or the wall for a more natural look. Also note, that TTL mode is your best bet as far as artificial lighting is concerned.

  1. Prepare yourself for action shots

Action shots in event photography are far more enthralling than simple people posing for a snapshot.

After all, it’s a lot more interesting to capture a photograph depicting Leane throwing a bouquet of flowers in the air with all her friends standing behind, getting ready to see who can catch it first, than the smiling photograph of a person who caught it in the end.

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Event photography requires you to be ready on your toes almost all the time. You never know what’s going to come. So always be on the lookout.

  1. Mix up your photo shoot

Having a group of three to five people in the background counts as a good composition.

Mix your shots with head, full body, and medium shots. Crop accordingly and avoid blank spaces unless that’s the look you’re going for.

You should also use the focal length of your lens to your advantage. You don’t want a lot of distortion; do you?

  1. Shoot in the RAW

Now, this almost goes without saying. You should always shoot in the RAW if you want to end up with high-quality photographs.

So that more or less things up. Hope you had a good and enlightening read.

Contributed By: www.just-pose.com

A post by alanloyed (20 Posts)

alanloyed is author at LeraBlog. The author's views are entirely his/her own and may not reflect the views and opinions of LeraBlog staff.

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