The innerspring mattresses

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fewfwThe inner spring mattresses are commonly known as spring mattresses. An inner spring mattress is constructed using coils and it has three components which are the fabric cover, a comfort layer and a support layer.

The support layer which also referred to as the spring core is the interior body that offers support when one is sleeping. It contains thousands of steel springs which are also called coil springs. When you are buying an inner spring mattress at thebest-mattress.org or anywhere else you must consider various factors that when combined determine the mattress’s firmness, softness and whether it is cheap or expensive. Those factors include the gauge and count.

The comfort layer which is also referred to as the upholstery layer is the top most layer that is made from fibers or foams which offer cushioning and comfort. The main material used on the comfort layer is the gel memory foam, latex, visco-elastic and polyurethane form. Some cheaper options can have a top layer that is made from cotton, polyester and polypropylene material.

The fabric cover is what covers the entire innerspring mattress. This cover can be of any pattern or color and is made from polyester yarns. The most expensive innerspring mattress may have a fabric cover that is made from a combination of silk, wool, cotton, rayon and polyester.

The inner spring mattresses have different coil types of different patterns. These coil types include the open coils. Open coils are also known as bonnell and are mostly found in old mattresses. They have multiple springs of hour glass shape which are made from tempered steel that is laced to form the body of the inner spring structure. Compared to the other types, the open coil design offers average durability, support and motion isolation.

The second type of coils is the offset coils. Inner spring mattresses that have offset coils are more expensive compared to those that have bonnell. Both bonnell and offset coils have similar structure and design but in offset every spring is hinged together in order to offer body contouring and movement isolation. This is why you will mostly find offset coils in middle or highly priced inner spring mattresses.

The third types of coils are the continuous coils. They comprise of rows of springs which are made from a long steel wire that is shaped into springs that run the width and length of bed. Continuous coils offer reduced amount of body contouring and movement isolation and you will mostly find them in the cheapest types of innerspring mattresses.

The fourth coil type is the pocket spring coils. They are made from several springs which work independently and are wrapped with some type of fabric or cloth. These types of coils are the best and they are found in the most expensive inner spring mattresses. They provide the highest amount of support and motion isolation.

When it comes to coil count in inner spring mattresses, this simply means the number of springs or coils that the inner structure contains. In some premium inner spring mattress models you can find they are 500 or even 2000 in number. Be aware that for the queen size models the figure will be quoted and for the full or twin the figures differ as per each model. Generally, if there are many coils the mattress will cost high and vice versa. But it is not only the coil count that determines the price. Other factors like wire gauge and design are also considered.

The last factor that determines the firmness of an inner spring mattress is the coil gauge. A coil gauge measures how thick the spring used to make the whole mattress is. If the figure is high then the spring is thin and if the number is low then the spring is thick. For example, inner spring mattresses which have a coil gauge of 15 are soft and those that have a coil gauge of 12 are firm.

A post by anawiesz (747 Posts)

anawiesz is author at LeraBlog. The author's views are entirely his/her own and may not reflect the views and opinions of LeraBlog staff.
I'm a professional writer and likes to write about online shopping.

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