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How to make a funeral more personal

Losing someone is often one of the hardest things that you’ll go through in your life. The loss of a loved one has a deep impact, and the feelings can ripple through to even the unlikeliest parts of our life.

Funerals can be difficult, hard to go to, and stressful to plan. A funeral does have its benefits, though, as it allows for you and the other people around you to get some closure and celebrate the person that you loved so very much.

It’s for this reason that funerals have almost always existed. They are a way to bring the people that loved that individual together as they deal with their feelings as a group while experiencing some of the positive emotions that person brought to so many of their lives through talking about certain memories.

From rituals to superstitions, each culture has its unique take on how a funeral should be carried out to honor the one that has passed.

Unfortunately, while these traditions are mostly positive, they can lead to a very cookie-cutter view of planning a funeral and leave little to the imagination when it comes to making that day as special as the person who has died was.

It’s great to incorporate the normal funeral traditions into the day, but at the same time, it shouldn’t stop you from making that day personal. Here are just a few ideas of how you can do that.

Having their favorite things there

It’s difficult to imagine, but everyone on earth has as unique a life as you do. This means that everyone has their own likes, dislikes, and things that make up who they are.

For this reason, it can be a great idea to have the things the deceased loved there with you during the funeral and wake. This could be anything, and there is probably a lot to choose from, as the person who has passed was most likely a varied and one-of-a-kind individual.

Whether you make sure the food at the wake is full of what they liked to eat or only play their favorite band, there are so many things that can be added to remind all attendees of what that person was passionate about.

Let their personality shine through

Due to the emotions that are often involved during a funeral, it’s only natural that things appear somber. If it’s not everyone dressed in black, then it will be the simple wooden coffin or the usual bouquets of flowers dotted around the room.

While this is certainly the time and place for more subtle tones, it doesn’t have to be if you don’t want it to. Was their favorite color green? Why not ask everyone to put on something in that color? Perhaps they never went anywhere without a hat on. Maybe you could ask each guest to wear one during the day.

Funerals don’t all have to look the same; they can be as personal as that individual was. Even something like their urn, if they are cremated, can be made to reflect who they were by shopping somewhere like www.commemorativecremation.com.

Ask some unconventional people to speak

During a funeral, it’s common practice to have those closest to the person speak about how important the one who has passed was. This is a great way for everyone attending to hear more about the person they were to their closest friends and family. It can be a great way to celebrate their life.

However, much like everyone has their interests, they also have a variety of relationships throughout their lives. Just look at your own life; you are so many different things to a number of people, from child, parent, sibling, and cousin to friend, business partner, colleague, and neighbor.

The person you are saying goodbye to probably touched a lot of lives in a wide range of ways. By asking some of these unconventional people to speak, you are giving everyone a completely new perspective on who they were and are opening the room to the laughs and happy memories that this may involve.

A funeral can be difficult, but by making it more personal and allowing it to reflect the one who has died, it can be a much more memorable occasion.

A post by Kidal D. (5709 Posts)

Kidal D. is author at LeraBlog. The author's views are entirely their own and may not reflect the views and opinions of LeraBlog staff.