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Effective Techniques To Protect Fragile Items In Transit

Statistics suggest that 934 million parcels were shipped across Australia in 2019 and that this number is increasing every year. It’s a huge number and will help you to understand why it’s inevitable that some parcels get damaged or lost during transit.

Of course, that doesn’t make you feel any better if it is yours that has been damaged. This is especially true when businesses lose parcels as it can negatively affect their reputation.

Regardless of why you are sending something, if it’s fragile you need to take extra precautions to ensure your parcel arrives safely.

  1. Use Data Loggers

Data loggers are a great way to let courier services know that the parcel is being monitored and it is easy to attribute blame to the company if a parcel is damaged. This makes it easier to claim against the courier’s insurance which will increase their costs and potentially cause business issues.

There are several different types of data loggers, ranging from the temperature data logger to shock loggers. In all instances, a sticker is applied to the parcel. The sticker has pre-defined characteristics. For example, it will monitor the temperature and know if it moves outside a defined range. Equally, it may monitor the weight on a box, to ensure that the boxes are not stacked too high. These data loggers can also detect drops or being positioned at an incorrect angle.

The addition of data loggers helps to ensure that the courier company looks after your parcel and it arrives in one piece.

  1. Fill All Spaces

Another key part of successfully sending fragile items is to fill all the packaging space. It is very rare for an item to be exactly the same shape and size as the packaging. This is difficult even when the packaging is purpose-built.

To help protect your fragile item you need to ensure all spaces in the box are filled,, this will reduce the chance of the item moving and protect it from impacts.

You can use bubble wrap, old pieces of paper, air bubbles, dedicated packaging materials, or even shredded paper. Virtually anything can be used to pack around your object, as long as it helps to fill the box and protect the item.

  1. Label It

A data logger is a great addition to your parcel as it lets the transport company know they have to be extra careful. However, a more basic approach that should also be used is simply adding ‘fragile’ to the parcel.

If you use tape with this written on it then the courier will find it hard to miss. This can highlight the delicate nature of the product and draw attention to any data logger on the package.

While labelling doesn’t verify who causes damage, it does highlight the nature of the package and encourages careful handling.

  1. Use A Reputable Company

If you want to keep your fragile items safe during transit then you need to choose a company that respects the parcels they deliver. There are plenty of companies offering delivery services and it can be very tempting to go for the cheapest one to help keep costs low.

However, you should spend a little time assessing the reputation and history of a business first. This can be easily done by talking to others that use the service and by using social media and online forums. You’ll be able to see which companies have a good reputation for looking after their customers and parcels, and which don’t.

It is likely to cost a little more to send with a reputable company but, the trade-off is that you’ll get great service and your parcel will arrive in good condition. That’s worth a few dollars extra.

Final Thoughts

You know your product best which makes you the best person to decide the packaging arrangements. This is an important part of protecting your fragile items in transit. But, the critical part is the company you use as this is when it is impossible to see what s happening to your parcels. By using the above tips, particularly the data loggers, you’ll be assured your package is looked after and know who to blame if it isn’t.

A post by Kidal D. (5811 Posts)

Kidal D. is author at LeraBlog. The author's views are entirely their own and may not reflect the views and opinions of LeraBlog staff.