Management

How to Make an Impression on Your First Day in The Office

people-in-the-officeSo you nailed the job interview, got the position and now it's your first day, you need to make your mark. You could get all serious and become the best of the best. Or you could distinguish yourself as an individual to be trusted, consulted, liked and noticed. Check out how three basic ‘first day encounters' can be tailored to your individual style and help you rise above being the newbie.

Ask Questions

You remember when you were at school and the science teacher would be waffling on about something to do with chemical bonds and you'd be thinking ‘I know nothing about anything'? It can be like that at work too, especially on your first day when you can't tell one rope from the next.

Asking questions about tasks you're set or projects you're briefed on in meetings isn't a sign of your incompetence. It's a sign that your head is screwed on, that you're listening and that you're totally engaged with your work. It's natural for things to get lost in translation so if you're not sure, clear it up before getting to work. It'll save you a lot of grief.

And the best thing about sticking your hand up when the managers says ‘any questions' is that you're probably helping out half of the people in the room with you. They may feel less confident in asking the ‘Why' and the ‘What' so you are doing them a favour as well as yourself. Never be afraid to be clear on your job.

Lunch Hour Activities

You have an hour for lunch. Do you a) sit there snacking on chocolate digestives, scanning Facebook and ignoring everyone around you, or b) do something totally different and beneficial that helps you make new friends? Get away from the desk and go for a walk. Invite people along for the stroll whilst you're at it because the odds are someone in that office is looking to get healthy.

If it's tipping down outside, why not find a quiet space and do a bit of meditation or yoga? Okay you might come off as a bit of a hippy to begin with but remember: it's your first day. Doing either one of those is going to de-stress you and improve your work-head for the rest of the day. If you're not the only newbie, invite the other(s) to join you. If anyone questions you, explain that you find it really beneficial to keep your mind clear and keep stress at bay. You might even set a trend.

Volunteer

There's another 90 minutes before home time and you have nothing to do. Get out of your chair and pay a visit to the boss. Why on earth would you want to do this on your first day? It shows that you don't shrink away from the person at the top, for starters.

This isn't just a social call though, oh no. You're here to step up and volunteer. Let your supervisor know that you've completed whatever tasks you were set and then ask if there are any additions or loose ends that need tidying up, seeing as you have time on your hands. Ask if there's anything that needs preparing for the next working day.

Do this and then congratulate yourself. Whether you get extra work to do before you head home or not, you've just demonstrated mind-blowing initiative and dedication to your job. On the first day.

One tiny note of caution for this one, however. Being the eager beaver and going to the boss in this manner might leave other colleagues feeling a bit shown up. You don't want to alienate them on your first day so perhaps rather than going to the boss first, ask around your nearest colleagues if you can help out with anything before home time.

It's easy to fade into the background in a new job but by opening yourself up to different ways of connecting with people and the fact that you are more than your CV, you're going to become unforgettable for all the right reasons, fast. Be an individual who knows how to be a team player instead of just another pawn.

Do you know any other good ways of standing out on your first day?

An article published on behalf of Sam Russell. Sam is unique to the core and dedicated to personal honesty, celebrating individuality and developing interpersonal skills. He writes fiction with authentic characters and blogs for Applied Workplace.

A post by Kidal D. (3252 Posts)

Kidal D. is author at LeraBlog. The author's views are entirely his/her own and may not reflect the views and opinions of LeraBlog staff.
Chief editor and author at LERAblog, writing useful articles and HOW TOs on various topics. Particularly interested in topics such as Internet, advertising, SEO, web development, and business.

Do you have any questions? Please ask.