Personal finance

Using Nails as an Extra Source of Income

beautiful-nailsWhen it comes to getting a little extra cash, using nail art can provide you with a small income or potentially give you the makings of a small business. Becoming a professional at nails is an attainable goal as the supplies are not only cheap to acquire, but practising on yourself or a willing friend is also a good way of increasing your knowledge about nail care.

Working for yourself will mean that each day is completely different, just as your clientele will be, and on top of this you'll have the flexibility that other jobs don't have such as choosing your own working hours. Many professional nail technicians don't use their talents for regular clients and instead offer their surfaces to hospitals and residential homes to give others that can't get access to salons a chance to be pampered.

Things You'll Need To Get Started

  • Keep It Legal: Rather than offering this service purely to friends and family, if you wanted to create your own business then you'd need to declare it with Inland Revenue first.
  • Do A Course: One of the biggest benefits to taking a nail art course is that it's one of the quickest and easiest courses to take, so you won't have to wait long to put your skills to the test.
  • Suitable Workspace: One point of consideration is where you will offer this service. Will you be going door to door, renting a small area in a salon or allowing clients to come to your own home?
  • Supplies: Fortunately, nail supplies are super cheap and last long enough so you won't need to replace them too often, so you can keep a good supply for whenever you need them. Since the tools of your trade are so important, you'll need some beauty storage boxes (see RooBeauty.com for examples) to put them into that'll not only securely store your items, but give your clientele a reason to take you seriously.

Word of mouth is one of the best ways to get your services out there, so even if you feel like you're bombarding your friends and family, encourage them to spread the word and even offer your services to them so they can visually show people why they should go to you to do their nails. Social networking is one of the best ways to share news about your business as well as offering people a non-threatening way of getting in touch will you and inquiring more info.

Which Services Should You Consider Offering?

There are plenty of things you can offer your clientele, so don't assume that because you're not in a salon that people won't require more from you than the default.

  • Manicures - One of the most desired looks and usually the standard service that every salon will offer that takes around 20 minutes to complete. This involves the basic grooming, but can also include exfoliation, conditioning and moisturising stages.
  • Pedicures – Everything that's done in a manicure only to the feet instead! If you think you have an issue with handling someone else's feet, it's best you don't add it to the business card!
  • Nail Art – This artistic and creative stance on nail designs has grown dramatically in recent years and varies from designs that use 3D attachments to designs done with an enamel pen. As this service is an art form that some don't have the time to take up and learn themselves, this is a service that many would appreciate.
  • Nail Acrylics – Many people with short or damaged nails will want some acrylic ones to not only make them better looking visually, but for flawless looks they're consistent designs are perfect

While becoming a nail technician only requires a little hard work in the beginning, with a little practise and an effort to getting yourself known and you could end up with a viable business that sees you with more income.

Gemma Rainbird is passionate about sharing her nail art skills with the world, particularly when it comes to making money through this wonderful beauty art.

A post by Kidal D. (3438 Posts)

Kidal D. is author at LeraBlog. The author's views are entirely his/her own and may not reflect the views and opinions of LeraBlog staff.
Chief editor and author at LERAblog, writing useful articles and HOW TOs on various topics. Particularly interested in topics such as Internet, advertising, SEO, web development, and business.

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