Top Online Educational Resources for Students

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nutrition_educationThe many forms of education and variety of subjects means that is it impossible to gather a list of great resources that comprehensively cover them all. That is why this article goes less for variety and more for quality. Some (if not all) the websites listed on this article are fantastic educational resources for students.

1. Wibit.net

For a long time this programming-teaching website has been free, though they have started to introduce membership fees, but they are at blisteringly low prices. What is great about this website? The fact that it is the best website or service ever created to learn programming. It is run by two nerds (as you will hear when watch the videos), but these two know so much about programming that they are dangerous. Not only does it become advanced enough to get you a job at any software company on the planet, they also start in a way that allows any newbie to start. You can start on their first lessons without any form of programming knowledge and they will hold your hand and take you through every element to get you up to speed. It is the most starter-friendly service on the Internet and the programming knowledge they give is advanced and correct every time.

2. The National Association for Music

There is a lot on this website that is aimed at teachers, but there is plenty that a student can take away from this website. The store is not very student-friendly, but the books are quite helpful to some students. It will help improve your learning skills over actually teaching you how to play an instrument. You can learn things you can leverage within your actual music classes.

3. Educational technology and mobile learning

The creators have tried to make a website just for teachers, but they have unwittingly created a fantastic resource for students wishing to learn anything. Look at their “categories” section and you will find over 100 tools that will help you learn online. There are tools that will aid you in every type of study and almost every type of online activity.

4. TED

TED is an event where people of different backgrounds, qualifications, education and success present their take on a certain subject. There are a lot of respected people that attend the TED such as Stephen Hawking, but beware that there are a few hacks such as J.J. Abrams and his mystery box (i.e. treat people like idiots and they will buy your crap).

5. Math Drills

This is truly an epic website for people wanting to refresh parts of their math learning. This sort of thing comes up every now and again. If you have just started a new course and there are mathematics that need touching up then you should really try this website. It does start at a low level, but it climbs up to teach and re-teach you the math fundamentals that will help you work through any adult learning or job situation that needs math skills.

6. Laura Candler

There are resources and links to websites on a number of math and science subjects. They are supposed to be resources for teachers, but they work just as well for curious students. There are a lot of dud links that are just pointing to people trying to soak money from teachers and students, but it gets a listing on this article because there are some handy links to websites that will prove to be great resources for students. The links to online freebies are especially helpful too.

7. The National Gallery of Art

If you are an art student then this is going to come in very handy. It is a government-funded gallery of some great art that you can use in your art projects or for your art essays. Try the collections page so you can see the variety of images they have on file. Drill down the links to each collection because they have quite a lot of paintings (even though it doesn't appear that way to start with).

8. Resources for music education

This section is not going to be able to do this website justice. It is just a directory of links, but if you are taking any kind of music lesson or course then you will be hard pressed to find something that “doesn't” help you. There are links to straight lessons on things such as drums, guitar etc, and there are links to websites with lists of arias, choral research websites, band director websites, the college of musicians website and may more.

9. Essaymama.com

The blog is particularly good because the people that write it are insiders (so to speak). They are the people that run colleges, mark essays and arrange student activities. They have the inside track that students do not get when they are in college. You get to learn secrets that only professors, essay markers and event organizers know. They give you the secrets that are overheard by secretaries and that are drunkenly discussed at professor luncheons. A lot of their content is on student life and essay writing, which is especially handy because essay marking is both a structured affair and a human affair, so there are plenty of areas where you can take advantage to skim a slightly higher grade on your essays.

10. Japanese Pod 101

The lessons are great and it is a shame they charge people money to see them. There is a lot of free content on the website for learning Japanese, and they offer a word of the day that is sent to your email address everyday to help you learn a new word and put it into sentences every day. They do have a free trail you can try for a week, but you are going to hate it for the fact that the lessons are so good and so easy to follow that you will resent it a little when the free trial expires and they start asking for money. They have really made the lessons very easy to understand. The only negative points are that they charge money for the service (which is fair, as they should be rewarded for their efforts) and the fact that the woman says “Taa daa” every time she reveals a new trick or secret to learning the language, which is a lot of “Taa daas” within the hundreds of videos.

A post by Jessica Millis (2 Posts)

Jessica Millis is author at LeraBlog. The author's views are entirely his/her own and may not reflect the views and opinions of LeraBlog staff.
Jessica Millis, an aspiring writer and content editor. JMU professor assistant. See more information on http://about.me/jessica.millis

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